Remote Viewing the Statues on Easter Island

Easter Island Statues (photo by Honey Hooper)

Easter Island Statues (photo by Honey Hooper)

The Target: The Statues of Easter Island

The Cue: Describe this place

I was blind to the target and the cue.

To realize your full potential as a remote viewer requires the ability to analyze your sessions objectively as well as the ability to integrate what you have learned. Learning from your practice is crucial if you want to improve.

When I was a beginner, I was told that I could achieve my goals if I did three remote viewing sessions a day. I was very enthusiastic, and it was a time in my life when I was single and had few responsibilities, so I went for it.

For many years, I attempted to maintain the magic number of three sessions per day, but on average it was more like one session per day. I had some good results, but I also had my fair share of frustration and disappointment.

Remote viewing session sketch by Edward Riordan, 2013.

Remote viewing session sketch by Edward Riordan, 2013.

Eventually I realized that the quality of your remote viewing sessions is far more important than the quantity. Three sessions a day is overtraining, which can be detrimental to the learning process because it doesn’t allow enough time to fully analyze and learn from your sessions.

Even one remote viewing session each day is too many. The mind needs time to disconnect from each session. Otherwise, you may start to see data from previous sessions infecting your current work or you may simply not have all your remote viewing circuitry available in the present moment.

It is a good idea to learn how to clear mental debris that remains after a remote viewing session. There are many ways to help with this, such as meditation or exercise. But sometimes it just takes time.

At this stage in my training, doing 2-3 full sessions a week allows me enough time to process each session and to recover my mental energy to focus on the next session.

Summary of Data

Located in the South Pacific, Easter Island is one of the most isolated islands in the world. It is famous for its monumental humanoid statues, called moai, which are often arranged in rows along the shore, facing the ocean. Carved centuries ago, each statue represented the deceased head of a lineage.

Evidence suggests that Easter Island was colonized deliberately, and the population flourished in their new island paradise. However, as the population grew, the island’s environment was transformed. Deforestation increased, and the islanders struggled to obtain the resources to support the culture.

Apparently, disagreements became common (with some violence), and the people lost confidence in the old religion, as suggested by the ruins of some moai, which were deliberately toppled by human hands. The population crashed in numbers, reaching a low of several hundred. To survive, the residents sometimes resorted to cannibalism. (Wiki)

In this session, I perceived groups of people all facing in the same direction. They were a “hardened,” “resilient,” “mighty” people who were “entrenched” and “restricted.” They “banded together” and were “moving together in the same direction.” These people were fighting to overcome a “challenge,” an “obstacle,” and a “stalemate.”

Although some of these descriptors may indicate that I was remote viewing the statues, I felt that I was remote viewing actual human beings and not statues or monuments.

 

Remote Viewing Protocol:
Stage 1 Revisited

Stage 1 Ideogram by Edward Riordan

Stage 1 Ideogram by Edward Riordan

The Controlled Remote Viewing protocol consists of six commonly used stages, each with its own unique objective. The objective of Stage 1 is to connect with the target. The viewer produces a quick kinesthetic response upon receiving a target reference number. This doodle is called an ideogram.

Because it is drawn reflexively by the nervous system, the ideogram is a stylized representation of the gestalt of the target or one aspect of the target. Generally, it is a simple line drawing of an angle or squiggle. The viewer then describes the overall motion and feeling of the ideogram, and concludes Stage 1 with a brief analytical label of the target—i.e., land, water, or structure.

Feeling Confident in Stage 1

The first stage—also referred to as the Ideogram A/B process or IAB—may be the least understood stage in CRV, and as a result, it is often executed incorrectly.

I have practiced remote viewing for over a decade, and until recently, I did not understand the importance of Stage 1. The initial training I received had not prepared me to successfully execute or utilize this stage. In fact, not only was I missing the point, I was taking IAB for granted.

Stages 2-6 are much better spent describing the target rather than searching for it. Stage 1 is where the rubber meets the road, and without that connection, you might end up in a ditch.

So instead of feeling confident and connected with the “signal line” from the beginning, I worked my way into the signal line—a process that at its worst might consume the entire remote viewing session.

This flawed system worked for me to a degree, but now I know that Stages 2-6 are much better spent describing the target rather than searching for it. In short, Stage 1 is where the rubber meets the road, and without that connection, you might end up in a ditch.

Being Open to the “Signal”

To be successful in Stage 1 requires receptivity and honesty—you need to be open to the signal and honest with yourself. A degree of humility is required to be able to discern subtle data that is not sourced by your ego, which may be driven by the need to be “right” or succeed.

If your analytical mind is producing the ideogram, you’re missing the objective of Stage 1. If you’re not confident that you have the signal here, then you need to start over again.

Learning to Perceive Data

Stage 1 may be the most difficult stage to teach and grasp. How do you teach someone to perceive psychic data? Any language-based attempt to teach someone to recognize a psychic data stream about a remote viewing target would be sorely inadequate. It is an inner process that cannot be expressed in language. Such data are uniquely individual—I cannot experience what you are experiencing.

To build confidence in your inner perceptions requires objective self-observation; you need to become familiar with the boundaries and language of your own inner noise before you can feel certain about new information entering your psyche.

Here we begin to enter the realms of consciousness explored in meditation, spirituality and poetry. This is also the connection, known as the Muse, which has inspired artists throughout history. The remote viewing protocol is, from this perspective, just another tool for accessing those subtle parts of our consciousness that do not communicate with the language we use daily. And, like an artist, the remote viewer objectifies the data stream.

To build confidence in your inner perceptions requires objective self-observation; you need to become familiar with the boundaries and language of your own inner noise before you can feel certain about new information entering your psyche. There are many ways to explore one’s psyche, including sensory deprivation, meditation, chanting, altered states of consciousness, etc. It may take some time and practice, but don’t be discouraged. It will pay off!