Remote Viewing the Statues on Easter Island

Easter Island Statues (photo by Honey Hooper)

Easter Island Statues (photo by Honey Hooper)

The Target: The Statues of Easter Island

The Cue: Describe this place

I was blind to the target and the cue.

To realize your full potential as a remote viewer requires the ability to analyze your sessions objectively as well as the ability to integrate what you have learned. Learning from your practice is crucial if you want to improve.

When I was a beginner, I was told that I could achieve my goals if I did three remote viewing sessions a day. I was very enthusiastic, and it was a time in my life when I was single and had few responsibilities, so I went for it.

For many years, I attempted to maintain the magic number of three sessions per day, but on average it was more like one session per day. I had some good results, but I also had my fair share of frustration and disappointment.

Remote viewing session sketch by Edward Riordan, 2013.

Remote viewing session sketch by Edward Riordan, 2013.

Eventually I realized that the quality of your remote viewing sessions is far more important than the quantity. Three sessions a day is overtraining, which can be detrimental to the learning process because it doesn’t allow enough time to fully analyze and learn from your sessions.

Even one remote viewing session each day is too many. The mind needs time to disconnect from each session. Otherwise, you may start to see data from previous sessions infecting your current work or you may simply not have all your remote viewing circuitry available in the present moment.

It is a good idea to learn how to clear mental debris that remains after a remote viewing session. There are many ways to help with this, such as meditation or exercise. But sometimes it just takes time.

At this stage in my training, doing 2-3 full sessions a week allows me enough time to process each session and to recover my mental energy to focus on the next session.

Summary of Data

Located in the South Pacific, Easter Island is one of the most isolated islands in the world. It is famous for its monumental humanoid statues, called moai, which are often arranged in rows along the shore, facing the ocean. Carved centuries ago, each statue represented the deceased head of a lineage.

Evidence suggests that Easter Island was colonized deliberately, and the population flourished in their new island paradise. However, as the population grew, the island’s environment was transformed. Deforestation increased, and the islanders struggled to obtain the resources to support the culture.

Apparently, disagreements became common (with some violence), and the people lost confidence in the old religion, as suggested by the ruins of some moai, which were deliberately toppled by human hands. The population crashed in numbers, reaching a low of several hundred. To survive, the residents sometimes resorted to cannibalism. (Wiki)

In this session, I perceived groups of people all facing in the same direction. They were a “hardened,” “resilient,” “mighty” people who were “entrenched” and “restricted.” They “banded together” and were “moving together in the same direction.” These people were fighting to overcome a “challenge,” an “obstacle,” and a “stalemate.”

Although some of these descriptors may indicate that I was remote viewing the statues, I felt that I was remote viewing actual human beings and not statues or monuments.

 

Remote Viewing Protocol:
Stage 1 Revisited

Stage 1 Ideogram by Edward Riordan

Stage 1 Ideogram by Edward Riordan

The Controlled Remote Viewing protocol consists of six commonly used stages, each with its own unique objective. The objective of Stage 1 is to connect with the target. The viewer produces a quick kinesthetic response upon receiving a target reference number. This doodle is called an ideogram.

Because it is drawn reflexively by the nervous system, the ideogram is a stylized representation of the gestalt of the target or one aspect of the target. Generally, it is a simple line drawing of an angle or squiggle. The viewer then describes the overall motion and feeling of the ideogram, and concludes Stage 1 with a brief analytical label of the target—i.e., land, water, or structure.

Feeling Confident in Stage 1

The first stage—also referred to as the Ideogram A/B process or IAB—may be the least understood stage in CRV, and as a result, it is often executed incorrectly.

I have practiced remote viewing for over a decade, and until recently, I did not understand the importance of Stage 1. The initial training I received had not prepared me to successfully execute or utilize this stage. In fact, not only was I missing the point, I was taking IAB for granted.

Stages 2-6 are much better spent describing the target rather than searching for it. Stage 1 is where the rubber meets the road, and without that connection, you might end up in a ditch.

So instead of feeling confident and connected with the “signal line” from the beginning, I worked my way into the signal line—a process that at its worst might consume the entire remote viewing session.

This flawed system worked for me to a degree, but now I know that Stages 2-6 are much better spent describing the target rather than searching for it. In short, Stage 1 is where the rubber meets the road, and without that connection, you might end up in a ditch.

Being Open to the “Signal”

To be successful in Stage 1 requires receptivity and honesty—you need to be open to the signal and honest with yourself. A degree of humility is required to be able to discern subtle data that is not sourced by your ego, which may be driven by the need to be “right” or succeed.

If your analytical mind is producing the ideogram, you’re missing the objective of Stage 1. If you’re not confident that you have the signal here, then you need to start over again.

Learning to Perceive Data

Stage 1 may be the most difficult stage to teach and grasp. How do you teach someone to perceive psychic data? Any language-based attempt to teach someone to recognize a psychic data stream about a remote viewing target would be sorely inadequate. It is an inner process that cannot be expressed in language. Such data are uniquely individual—I cannot experience what you are experiencing.

To build confidence in your inner perceptions requires objective self-observation; you need to become familiar with the boundaries and language of your own inner noise before you can feel certain about new information entering your psyche.

Here we begin to enter the realms of consciousness explored in meditation, spirituality and poetry. This is also the connection, known as the Muse, which has inspired artists throughout history. The remote viewing protocol is, from this perspective, just another tool for accessing those subtle parts of our consciousness that do not communicate with the language we use daily. And, like an artist, the remote viewer objectifies the data stream.

To build confidence in your inner perceptions requires objective self-observation; you need to become familiar with the boundaries and language of your own inner noise before you can feel certain about new information entering your psyche. There are many ways to explore one’s psyche, including sensory deprivation, meditation, chanting, altered states of consciousness, etc. It may take some time and practice, but don’t be discouraged. It will pay off!

Remote Viewing an Anomaly Photographed by the Phobos 2 Spacecraft

Phobos, one of two moons orbiting Mars

Phobos, one of two moons orbiting Mars

The Cue: Describe the most important aspects of the target event at the instant of original imaging by the Phobos 2 spacecraft.

Monitor: Jerry Harthcock

I was blind to the target and the cue. The monitor (Jerry) was semi-frontloaded: He chose the target and created the cue.

In July 1988, Russia launched two unmanned probes—Phobos 1 and Phobos 2—to study Mars and its moons, Phobos and Deimos. Fourteen additional nations participated in the  mission, including the United States, Sweden, West Germany and France.

The last photograph taken by the Phobos 2 Mars probe, which shows what appears to be a very large cylindrical object moving towards the small moon.

The last photograph taken by the Phobos 2 Mars probe.

Phobos 1 suffered a critical software failure and was lost before reaching Mars. Phobos 2 successfully entered orbit around Mars and sent back a total of 37 images before communication with the probe was lost on March 27, 1989.

Several of the photos taken by Phobos 2 show strange anomalies on both Mars and its moon Phobos. The final photo shows what appears to be a very large cylindrical object moving towards the small moon.

In this session, I was tasked to describe the most important aspects of the target event captured by Phobos 2 in the last photo taken by the probe before its systems failed.

Sketch of the Phobos Moon by Edward Riordan

Sketch done in-session by Edward Riordan

Because of the unusual nature of this target, I found it difficult to write this article as some of the information is very strange.  At this time, I cannot verify most of the perceptions that came through. However, several of my drawings resembled the probe and one drawing resembled the Phobos moon itself.

I perceived a colony of organic biological life forms at the site, which were in a type of incubation process. Some of the life forms were flawed and being rejected, while the rest were being pulled back into itself as if filtering out what was not its own. It appeared that the incubation process and growth rate were dependent on climate and fluctuating temperatures. The life forms had a spongy texture, which was moldy and porous.

 

Remote Viewing Session:
The International Space Station

Astronauts Robert L. Curbeam (USA) and Christer Fuglesang (Sweden) upgrading the power grid and attaching a new truss segment to the International Space Station. December 25, 2006.

Astronauts Robert L. Curbeam (USA) and Christer Fuglesang (Sweden) upgrading the power grid and attaching a new truss segment to the International Space Station. December 25, 2006.

The Task: Upgrading the International Space Station on December 25, 2006.

The Cue: Describe this event and place.

Monitor: Todd Ronan

The monitor and I were completely blind to the target and the cue.

The International Space Station is the largest man-made object orbiting Earth. A joint project including five different space agencies, the ISS serves as a research laboratory conducting experiments in biology, physics, meteorology and other fields. Occupied since November 2000, the station has housed the longest continual human presence in space.

In this session, I was tasked to remote view the International Space Station during an upgrade on December 25, 2006. I perceived a series of man-made objects, which together acted like a tuning fork that created feedback resonance between the objects. This resonance was associated with a theory on how things interact with each other. Some people believed that the theory was flawed and would fail. The resonance felt like an x-ray moving through my body, and it felt real to me. Long-term exposure to this feedback radiation affects the biology of those who are exposed to it, and it specifically affects the nervous system and the genetic code.

During post-session analysis and research, I learned that a group of Austrian scientists have proposed a series of experiments to test the theory of quantum entanglement using equipment on the Space Station. Quantum entanglement occurs when two connected but separated particles share information instantaneously. After installing a photon detection module onto one of the existing cameras on the Space Station, scientists on Earth will send individual entangled photons to the detection module.

Quantum physicists have successfully transported entangled photons 143 kilometers using lasers and 250 kilometers over optical fiber in the lab. The proposed tests using the Space Station would determine if it is possible to reliably transmit entangled photons over long distances, and may also shed light on gravity’s effect on quantum entanglement. If successful, these tests could prove the possibility of a satellite-based communication network using entangled photons. I don’t know if the 2006 upgrades to the ISS were related to the quantum entanglement research, but I believe my attention was pulled toward these experiments.

 

And here is a news clip about proposed quantum entanglement experiments that would be conducted on the International Space Station:

Remote Viewing Technology:
Wilhelm Reich’s Cloudbuster

Cloudbuster at The Wilhelm Reich Museum in Rangeley, Maine.

Cloudbuster at The Wilhelm Reich Museum in Rangeley, Maine.

The Task: Remote view a cloudbuster created by Wilhelm Reich.

The Cue: Describe this object and this technology.

Monitor: Todd Ronan

The monitor and I were completely blind to the target and the cue.

Wilhelm Reich was a controversial psychoanalyst and scientist born in Austria in 1897. Reich discovered a universal energy that he called orgone. He invented several devices that he claimed could manipulate orgone into an energy source. One such device was called a cloudbuster, which  presumably could alter weather. The cloudbuster was made of metal tubing that, when focused on a location in the sky, could draw orgone from the atmosphere into a body of water such as a lake. As a result, clouds would form or disperse.

My task in this session was to describe the device and its technology. I perceived that I was remote viewing a form of experimental technology. It reminded me of a power plant that was accumulating and building up energy inside a metallic structure. There was a strong sense of gravity—I felt as though I was being pulled to the ground by a spinning energy that was flashing and glowing. This technology appeared to be dangerous during the processing stage, but the end result is safe.  The disclosure of this energy source seemed to be a big step forward for humanity.

 

And check out this documentary about Wilhelm Reich and his work.